thoughts on art, interactivity, technology, design, culture & life

Posts Tagged website

I am not a huge sports fan, but I love the Olympics. They represent an opportunity not only for athletes, but for designers and artists as well. The branding of the games must represent the host city, but be accessible and understood by billions of people from all over the world. This is no small task. Perhaps my favorite part of the artistry and design of the Games is the artistic innovation that is presented. You have seen it before in Beijing's architectural Bird's Nest for their 2008 Games,1 London's 2012 Olympic logo (I know most people hate it, but I think its brilliant),2 and now in the Vancouver 2010 Olympic metals.

Vancouver 2010 Olympic Metals

Why these metals are innovative

YouTube Preview ImageObviously the fact that these metals break the standard form factor for Olympic metals with their sexy, modern, wavy shape, but that was not the piece of innovation I was impressed by; instead I was impressed by where the raw metal to make these awards came from. Rather than mine for the ridiculous amount of metal required to make 1,014 Olympic metals,3 the Olympic committee opted to recycle 6.8 metric tons of metal from landfill bound circuit boards. According to my math that means that over half of the metal used for the Olympic metals was recycled.4 It's good to see an organization finding a way to recycle at least some of the incredible amount of e-waste produced world wide each year.5 For more on these metals visit the Vancouver 2010's page about the metals.

FOOTNOTES
  1. Article on the Bird's Nest and Water Cube architecture for the Beijing Olympics
  2. A post on my previous blog about why this is an awesome logo
  3. 399 metals were made for the Paralympic and 615 for the Olympics (http://www.leaderpost.com/sports/2010wintergames/Olympic+medals+numbers/2106312/story.html)
  4. Teck provided 2,855 kg of mined metals vs. 6,910 kg of recycled metals -- see metal breakdown here
  5. For more on E-Waste check out this article in the Guardian

The other day I was watching TV and I saw the following commercial for Bacardi Mojito.

YouTube Preview Image

On top of being a really excellent commercial about timelessness and tradition, I was really impressed by the appropriateness of the music selection. A simple piano melody, a really great beat, a song that could meld with any of the eras depicted and sounded cool...you simply cannot go wrong with that.

After the commercial was over I walked to my computer and ran a Google search to find what song was used for the commercial. I found my answer on Adtunes.

Adtunes is an ad music website that serves as a guide to music used in television commercials, TV shows, movie trailers, film soundtracks, video games and more.

The song in the Bacardi Mojito commercial is by Matt & Kim and is called Daylight. Beyond finding my answer I also discovered some more cool music that I've heard and enjoyed before (but didn't know the name of) like Penguin Cafe Orchestra's Perpetuum Mobile. Go check out Adtunes, there's some awesome content on the site.

The fact that the economy is not doing well right now is no secret. Companies all around the world are being forced to lay-off workers to insure they can stay afloat. It's not a happy situation but we deal with it, some of us better than others. Belgian company So Nice is taking a more innovative approach to firing an employee...they've made a website allowing you to choose called "You choose...we fire".

While I don't speak the language the website is in, it is worth a visit to see a new way to approach the timeless situation of letting an employee go. Seeing as how this website has a viral quality to it maybe they'll even gain some business in the mean time. Props to So Nice for thinking outside the box and avoiding making a difficult decision themselves.

Back to Home
Preload image Preload image Preload image Preload image Preload image